Programs

Counterpoint Tactical System

The Counterpoint Tactical System, also known by the acronym CTS, is a weapon-based integrated martial art designed for the street with an emphasis on real-world tactical counter offense. Although an eclectic martial art, the counterpoint tactical systems largest traditional influence can be found in the Filipino Martial Arts. The purpose of CTS is to train and certify students and instructors, making them well versed in every phase of civilian armed and unarmed combat. The CTS curriculum is designed with a survival based philosophy and is not intended to be practiced or used as a sport. CTS uses a “Civilian Use of Force Continuum” to help students better understand real world violence and how to appropriately respond to a bad situation.

Being an integrated martial art, CTS uses tactics from various arts based on multiple attackers, weapons, range or strategy to formulate a cohesive curriculum. As the range changes so does the combative tactics. Categories of training include weapons techniques such as single and double stick, knife, staff, gun, and the combination of stick and dagger; and empty hand techniques such as kicking, stomping, striking, punching, trapping, locking, throwing and ground.

 

 

Cacoy Doce Pares Escrima

The ‘Doce Pares’ is an Escrima/Arnis Martial Arts Club that was founded in Cebu City in January 12, 1932. Originally it was a breakaway group of students and instructors from the ‘Labangon Fencing Club’ of the 1920’s which was influenced heavily by the Saavedra and Cañete families. The original instructors of the Doce Pares taught their own particular families, island’s or region’s styles of Escrima and their particular interpretation of their own styles. The Doce Pares was made famous in the international scene during the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and 90’s by the Cañete family, especially Ciriaco ‘Cacoy’ Cañete and later by his nephew Dionisio ‘Diony’ Cañete.

The term ‘Doce Pares’ is a Spanish term translated into English to mean ‘Twelve Pairs’. This term the ‘Twelve Pairs’ has been given several meanings to it. One refers to the twelve basic strikes that are common to most Escrima styles and schools and their twelve basic block and counters to these strikes. Another more romantic explanation is of the reference to the twelve pairs of ‘Compadres’, the bodyguards for the King Charlemagne and how the club should emulate the friendship of these warriors. The final explanation is that supposedly there were twelve original master members of the club.

There are no Grandmasters alive from the original founding members of the Doce Pares. However there are several senior instructors or Grandmasters of the second generation of Escrimadors/Arnisadors still alive that teach their own interpretation or styles of Escrima/Arnis within the club the Doce Pares.

Ciriaco Cañete or ‘Cacoy’ as he is known by his Filipino nick name, was born in August 1919 in San Fernando approximately 30 kilometers south of Cebu City, on Cebu Island, in the Visayas region of The Philippines. He was the youngest of twelve children. At the early age of seven he was initiated into Escrima, learning from his brother Filemon or “Momoy” who had in turn learnt Escrima from his father Gregorio and uncles Gavino, Pedro (from his father’s family) and Juancho (from his mother’s family). Because of his open mindedness and desire for knowledge, he has trained in many different styles of Martial Arts. Some of the styles he has learnt include Jui Jitsu, Boxing, Kodokan Judo, free style wrestling, Shorin Karate and Aikido. With his acknowledged spectrum of skills through his lifetime of training, he has gained a deep insight and a broad understanding, with mastery of the concepts of self-defense and combat. The culmination of years of learning fused into the style that he teaches which is called ‘Escrido’. This style combines the refined essential elements of every martial art he has learnt through his life.

 

 

Brazilian Ju Jitsu

Brazilian jiu-jitsu (‘BJJ, or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. Brazilian jiu-jitsu was formed from Kodokan Judo ground fighting (Ne-Waza) fundamentals that were taught to Carlos Gracie by master Mitsuyo Maeda. Brazilian jiu-jitsu eventually came to be its own art through the experimentations, practices, and adaptation from the Judo knowledge of Carlos and Helio Gracie, who then passed their knowledge onto their family.

BJJ promotes the concept that a smaller, weaker person can successfully defend against a bigger, stronger assailant by using leverage and proper technique, taking the fight to the ground – most notably by applying joint-locks and chokeholds to defeat the other person. BJJ training can be used for sport grappling tournaments (gi and no-gi) and mixed martial arts (MMA) competition or self-defense.[2] Sparring (commonly referred to as “rolling”) and live drilling play a major role in training, and a premium is placed on performance, especially in competition, in relation to progress and ascension through its ranking system.

Since its inception in 1914, its parent art of Judo was separated from older systems of Japanese ju-jitsu by an important difference that was passed on to Brazilian jiu-jitsu: it is not solely a martial art: it is also a sport; a method for promoting physical fitness and building character in young people; and, ultimately, a way (Do) of life.[3][4]

 

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